7 Safety Tips for Runners

Posted on June 14 2017

 

Running is probably one of my favorite solo sports out there. I find so much peace when I am out there. It’s just me and my legs. Time to reflect and let go as well as push past my limits and come out victorious to myself on the other side.

 

Because running is often something I do by myself, there are some safety concerns in both outside threats and physical ones. Here are 7 safety tips for runners if you are thinking of taking it up.

 

7 Safety Tips for Runners

 

1. Make yourself visible to traffic- As a driver, I can’t tell you how many times I saw a runner out there that wasn’t very visible. The problem, I think, is too many runners forget that dawn and dusk (the time lots of runners are out) is also a time with lower visibility for drivers on the road. To combat this problem, make sure you wear bright, reflective clothing (Rainbeau Curves often has reflective logos!) as well as consider getting some lights. I have a light set that snaps onto my shoes to help me be more visible.

 

2. Be sure to stay hydrated before, after and during- I learned the hard way that staying hydrated is essential for runner safety once during a run. I was running and I hadn’t really considered drinking water before I left and forgot my water bottle at home. Mid-run, I suddenly got a terrible sharp pain in my calf. I will never forget how much that hurt. Make sure when you run you stay well-hydrated, especially when you are running during the summer months when you are more likely to be dehydrated.

 

3. Use trails that others do- They say there is safety in numbers and with running this can be very true. Try to pick trails and walking paths that others use regularly. Not only will you see other runners out there so you can feel safer, but police and the public often patrol these areas more, too. Additionally, well-used trails are often better maintained so you are less likely to trip over things in your way.

 

4. Be careful with headphone use- I really love to listen to music when I run. It helps me keep pace and focus on something. I started using my headphones on a lower volume and with only one ear in for safety though. I realized I needed to be able to hear cars as well as be more aware of my surroundings.

 

5. Pay attention to traffic and go against it- When you ride a bike, you are usually advised to ride with the flow of traffic. This is because you are on wheels. As a runner, you should run against traffic because it will allow you to see cars before you and able to stop and avoid accidents.

 

6. Let others know you are leaving- I always let someone know I am leaving home to take a run when I do. I do this for a couple of reasons; so, if they wonder where I am going, they will know, but more importantly, so if I don’t come back in a reasonable time, they can send for help. I also try to let them know approximately where I will be running, too.

 

7. Be polite to drivers and others on the road- One of the worst things you can do that can put you and others in danger is to not use your manners. This seems silly, but it’s very important. Using your manners keeps you and others safe because it allows you to give right of way. Using your manners as a runner means stopping at crosswalks and waiting for drivers to wave you on as well as telling people walking on the sidewalk that you are passing on the right or left of them.

 

Read more by Christine here.

 

 

7 Safety Tips for Runners

Posted on June 14 2017

 

Running is probably one of my favorite solo sports out there. I find so much peace when I am out there. It’s just me and my legs. Time to reflect and let go as well as push past my limits and come out victorious to myself on the other side.

 

Because running is often something I do by myself, there are some safety concerns in both outside threats and physical ones. Here are 7 safety tips for runners if you are thinking of taking it up.

 

7 Safety Tips for Runners

 

1. Make yourself visible to traffic- As a driver, I can’t tell you how many times I saw a runner out there that wasn’t very visible. The problem, I think, is too many runners forget that dawn and dusk (the time lots of runners are out) is also a time with lower visibility for drivers on the road. To combat this problem, make sure you wear bright, reflective clothing (Rainbeau Curves often has reflective logos!) as well as consider getting some lights. I have a light set that snaps onto my shoes to help me be more visible.

 

2. Be sure to stay hydrated before, after and during- I learned the hard way that staying hydrated is essential for runner safety once during a run. I was running and I hadn’t really considered drinking water before I left and forgot my water bottle at home. Mid-run, I suddenly got a terrible sharp pain in my calf. I will never forget how much that hurt. Make sure when you run you stay well-hydrated, especially when you are running during the summer months when you are more likely to be dehydrated.

 

3. Use trails that others do- They say there is safety in numbers and with running this can be very true. Try to pick trails and walking paths that others use regularly. Not only will you see other runners out there so you can feel safer, but police and the public often patrol these areas more, too. Additionally, well-used trails are often better maintained so you are less likely to trip over things in your way.

 

4. Be careful with headphone use- I really love to listen to music when I run. It helps me keep pace and focus on something. I started using my headphones on a lower volume and with only one ear in for safety though. I realized I needed to be able to hear cars as well as be more aware of my surroundings.

 

5. Pay attention to traffic and go against it- When you ride a bike, you are usually advised to ride with the flow of traffic. This is because you are on wheels. As a runner, you should run against traffic because it will allow you to see cars before you and able to stop and avoid accidents.

 

6. Let others know you are leaving- I always let someone know I am leaving home to take a run when I do. I do this for a couple of reasons; so, if they wonder where I am going, they will know, but more importantly, so if I don’t come back in a reasonable time, they can send for help. I also try to let them know approximately where I will be running, too.

 

7. Be polite to drivers and others on the road- One of the worst things you can do that can put you and others in danger is to not use your manners. This seems silly, but it’s very important. Using your manners keeps you and others safe because it allows you to give right of way. Using your manners as a runner means stopping at crosswalks and waiting for drivers to wave you on as well as telling people walking on the sidewalk that you are passing on the right or left of them.

 

Read more by Christine here.

 

 

7 Safety Tips for Runners

Posted on June 14 2017

 

Running is probably one of my favorite solo sports out there. I find so much peace when I am out there. It’s just me and my legs. Time to reflect and let go as well as push past my limits and come out victorious to myself on the other side.

 

Because running is often something I do by myself, there are some safety concerns in both outside threats and physical ones. Here are 7 safety tips for runners if you are thinking of taking it up.

 

7 Safety Tips for Runners

 

1. Make yourself visible to traffic- As a driver, I can’t tell you how many times I saw a runner out there that wasn’t very visible. The problem, I think, is too many runners forget that dawn and dusk (the time lots of runners are out) is also a time with lower visibility for drivers on the road. To combat this problem, make sure you wear bright, reflective clothing (Rainbeau Curves often has reflective logos!) as well as consider getting some lights. I have a light set that snaps onto my shoes to help me be more visible.

 

2. Be sure to stay hydrated before, after and during- I learned the hard way that staying hydrated is essential for runner safety once during a run. I was running and I hadn’t really considered drinking water before I left and forgot my water bottle at home. Mid-run, I suddenly got a terrible sharp pain in my calf. I will never forget how much that hurt. Make sure when you run you stay well-hydrated, especially when you are running during the summer months when you are more likely to be dehydrated.

 

3. Use trails that others do- They say there is safety in numbers and with running this can be very true. Try to pick trails and walking paths that others use regularly. Not only will you see other runners out there so you can feel safer, but police and the public often patrol these areas more, too. Additionally, well-used trails are often better maintained so you are less likely to trip over things in your way.

 

4. Be careful with headphone use- I really love to listen to music when I run. It helps me keep pace and focus on something. I started using my headphones on a lower volume and with only one ear in for safety though. I realized I needed to be able to hear cars as well as be more aware of my surroundings.

 

5. Pay attention to traffic and go against it- When you ride a bike, you are usually advised to ride with the flow of traffic. This is because you are on wheels. As a runner, you should run against traffic because it will allow you to see cars before you and able to stop and avoid accidents.

 

6. Let others know you are leaving- I always let someone know I am leaving home to take a run when I do. I do this for a couple of reasons; so, if they wonder where I am going, they will know, but more importantly, so if I don’t come back in a reasonable time, they can send for help. I also try to let them know approximately where I will be running, too.

 

7. Be polite to drivers and others on the road- One of the worst things you can do that can put you and others in danger is to not use your manners. This seems silly, but it’s very important. Using your manners keeps you and others safe because it allows you to give right of way. Using your manners as a runner means stopping at crosswalks and waiting for drivers to wave you on as well as telling people walking on the sidewalk that you are passing on the right or left of them.

 

Read more by Christine here.

 

 



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